Beet Greens!

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Available starting this week we have Beet Greens.  This is a veggie that Jon and I became familiar with in Nova Scotia, where the race was on in the spring to be the first farm market to put “Beet Greens” on your roadside sign.  They’re one of the earliest greens crops and do well in the cool spring weather.  These are different from baby beets, because they’re harvested before there’s much more than a rat tail (see photo above)– so, still a nice “beet-y” flavour, but more like greens (spinach texture) than beets– and you eat the entire plant, from leaf to tail.  They are great sauteed in butter (but what isn’t?!), added to salads or soups or stir-fries or anywhere you want some greens (never tried in a smoothie, but I’m sure that would be good, too!).

Beet Greens!!!  Available for weekly customers and wholesale this week and they’ll be at the markets as well.

While I’m at it, here’s a photo of the Brandon Farmer’s Market stall this morning.  Jon and I will be doing that market each week, in what I called “the dark place” (the Town Centre parkade), where we’re glad for the roof over our heads, but sorry to be away from the sun!  So dark the camera goes on night mode and a clear photo cannot be achieved, so here’s the best I’ve got:

Market table June 20, 2015
Market table June 20, 2015
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#1 most asked question these days! We can’t wait, either!!

Pea Shoots and Sunflower Shoots and Wheatgrass trays

This week we have some extra Pea Shoot, Sunflower Shoot, and Wheatgrass trays for sale.  $10 per tray and $1 rebate if you return the tray.

Usually we need 2 weeks advance notice to produce these, so this is a good opportunity to get these awesome, healthful shoots at a good value– See below for photos and more info:

Pea Shoots!
Pea Shoots!
Sunflower Shoots!
Sunflower Shoots!
Wheatgrass trays for the market
Wheatgrass trays for the market

To market, to market we go!

This week we are starting with our weekly markets.

  • Friday from 10 – 2 outside Lady of the Lake (in our veggie trailer)
  • Saturday from 9 – 12 at the Brandon Farmer’s Market (in the parkade, first outdoor market this week)

    Please come visit us if you can and don’t forget to tell all your friends!  You can save this poster and email it, or link to this post 🙂

  • Where to find us 2015

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Veggies for market

Today we are getting all the veggies ready for the first market of the season, which is tomorrow (Friday June 12) inside the Brandon Town Centre from 9:30 – 4.

We’ll have:

  • salad mix
  • spinach
  • herbs (thyme, tarragon, dill, parsley, basil, mint, oregano)
  • preserves (dilly beans and carrots, beet pickles)
  • pea shoots
  • sunflower shoots
  • green onions
  • rhubarb
  • garlic chives
  • shallots
  • stinging nettles
  • 5 varieties of potatoes
Yukon Gold, Red, Shepody, Purple skin, Russet Potatoes
Yukon Gold, Red, Shepody, Purple skin, Russet Potatoes

Yukon Gold: the Yukon Gold can stand up to both dry heat and wet heat cooking methods. Its waxy moist flesh and sweet flavour make it ideal for boiling, baking and frying but these potatoes will also withstand grilling, pan frying, and roasting.

Red: waxy, moist and smooth; creamy.  Roasting, mashing, salads, soups/stews.  Because of their waxy texture, the flesh of red potatoes stays firm throughout the cooking process, whether they are being roasted or cooked in a stew. Their thin yet vibrant red skin adds appealing color and texture to side dishes and salads.Reds are frequently used to make tender yet firm potato salad or add pizazz to soups and stews, as well as being served baked or mashed.

Shepody (white): white skin, white moist flesh medium deep eyes. Excellent tasting potato. Excellent for boiling, baking or french fries.

Purple Skin:  Preferred Uses: roasting, grilling, salads, baking.  Purple potatoes have moist, firm flesh that retains its shape while adding rich, vibrant color and luscious earthy taste to salads. Steaming and baking are great ways to cook purple potatoes. Because of their mild yet distinctly nutty flavor, blue/purple potatoes naturally complement green salad flavors.

Russet:  Russet potatoes are the ideal potato for french fries, and are also commonly boiled in soups or stews, or boiled and mashed. When diced and fried, they are often referred to as “home fries”; roasting, either in slices or chunks, is also common.  A russet potato may also be baked whole.

June 10

Harvesting nettles in the woods.  The mosquitoes joined me, as well as two fox kits... Lookout, Chickens!
Harvesting nettles in the woods. The mosquitoes joined me, as well as two fox kits… Lookout, Chickens!
Harley the geriatric cat
Harley the geriatric cat
Jon planting the first row of carrots in the raised beds, made with our new bed former -- Thanks, Paul!
Jon planting the first row of carrots in the raised beds, made with our new bed former — Thanks, Paul!
Stephanie weeding in the West Garden
Stephanie weeding in the West Garden, garlic looking good in foreground

Happy June 1

Happy first of June!  I don’t have a verse to go with this month, but June is a great month in the farming business.  The freeze is over, the weather is mild, Mother Nature helps with long days for planting, and if we’re organized and a bit lucky we can take charge before the weeds take over.

Jon and I (Teri) both laugh out loud when we hear others describe farming as “working with nature”.  It sounds nice and poetic, but the truth is we’re fighting against nature at every turn!  Once a field is cleared and row crops planted, the natural order wants to fill in all that empty space with weeds.  It’s the farmer’s job to stay ahead of the weeds and help support the growth of the needy, high-maintenance and non-natural vegetables we want to grow in that space.  We organize our fields a particular way so that we can maximize the “many little hammers” method of weed control, attacking nature’s encroaching presence  with tractor cultivators and wheel hoes and stirrup hoes and our bare hands when necessary.  So, the gloves are off, weeds– Look out!

A good farmer is always looking down at the dirt.
A good farmer is always looking down at the dirt.
Jon transplanting lettuce
Jon transplanting lettuce
Oregano looks good!
Oregano looks good!
Green onions are ready this week as well
Green onions are ready this week as well
Watermelon transplants (Blacktail Mountain variety-- Thanks Jocelyn & Chris!)
Watermelon transplants (Blacktail Mountain variety– Thanks Jocelyn & Chris!)
Pea shoot seeds
Pea shoot seeds
Sunflower shoot seeds
Sunflower shoot seeds
Sea of greens in the greenhouse.  Spinach is ready outside now also.
Sea of greens in the greenhouse. Spinach is ready outside now also.
The work we have ahead of us.  Tomatoes, peppers and eggplant go out this week.  They escaped the frost Friday night cozy in the greenhouse... Other tomatoes were not so lucky!
The work we have ahead of us. Tomatoes, peppers and eggplant go out this week. They escaped the frost Friday night cozy in the greenhouse… Aunty Jayne’s tomatoes in Strathclair were not so lucky!